Strengths-Based Education for English Language Learners

Teachers of all subjects are encountering an ever-growing number of students for whom English is not their primary language in their classrooms today.  Many of these students do not develop academic English language proficiency while in school which greatly limits their future educational and career options.  In part, this is the result of educators often lacking the resources and training they need to effectively work with their English language learners.  Research shows that linguistically diverse students learn best when their instructors use the knowledge and aptitude they already have from their primary language in teaching them oral and writer English language skills. 

Below are some articles and websites offering numerous resources about educating ELL students:

Welcome ELLs: How to Make Your ELL Students Feel at Home
The Role of English Teachers in Educating English Language Learners
What Teachers Need to Know About Language
Colorín Colorado: A Bilingual Site for Families and Educators of English Language Learners
Teaching Diverse Learners: A Resource Dedicated to Enhancing the Capacity of Teachers to Work Effectively and Equitably with English Language Learners

After looking through these articles and resources, consider the following:

  1. What do I need to learn about language acquisition so I can be more effective in teaching linguistically diverse students?
  2. Does my school view linguistic diversity as an asset or a deficit?  How can we do a better job of building on the linguistic knowledge and skills our students already possess? 
  3. What can I do to ensure that ELL students feel welcome in my school and receive the education they deserve?

Thank you for subscribing to our weekly discussion.  Please visit the Center for Culturally Responsive Education (CRUE) website at www.cruecenter.org for more information and resources on educational equity.

nking about this topic make me feel?  What are my fears and concerns around talking with others about this topic?
  • How is the commonly held belief that Arab countries and people belong to a monolithic culture (e.g. all Arabs are Muslims) damaging to Arabs and Arab Americans?  How is it damaging to those who hold this belief?
  • What assumptions and stereotypes have I seen and heard about Arab Americans?  What can I do to challenge them?   
  • Does my school incorporate education about Arab countries and Arabic culture into its curriculum?  If not, what can I do to change this?
  • Thank you for subscribing to our weekly discussion.  Please visit the Center for Culturally Responsive Education (CRUE) website at www.cruecenter.org for more information and resources on educational equity.

       

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